Lectureperformance

Von Computerklängen zum elektronischen Dirigierstab

Artist / Referent

Max Mathews

Veranstaltungen

Mi 02. Mai 2001, 20:00 bis 22:00, bern
Do 03. Mai 2001, 20:00 bis 22:00, Zürich
Fr 04. Mai 2001, 20:00 bis 22:00, basel

In Zusammenarbeit mit dem Schweizerischen Zentrum für Computermusik. Vortrag und Präsentation in englischer Sprache

Der Vater der Computermusik - Von den ersten Computerklängen zum elektronischen Dirigierstab

Max Mathews ist der Vater der Computermusik. Die Ära der Computermusik begann 1957, als ein IBM 704 in NYC eine 17 sekundenlange Komposition auf dem Programm Music I spielte. Die Klangfarben und Töne waren noch nicht inspirierend, jedoch war der technische Durchbruch dieser Performance von umso grösser Bedeutung. Der Pionier Max Mathews schrieb in den Bell Laboratories, Murray Hill, USA, dieses erste Computerprogramm, welches speziell der musikalischen Klangsynthese mit Computern diente.

Mathews schrieb die Musik-Programmiersprachen Music I bis Music V, welche für alle nachfolgenden Nutzungen des Computers als Musikinstrument die Grundlage bildeten und schliesslich zu den digitalen Synthesizern und Sequenzern führten, die zur heutigen Allgegenwart von Computern in der Musik beitrugen.

Das von vielen Musiker der Elektronischen Szene verwendete Musikprogramm Max hat Max Mathews zwar nicht geschrieben, es wurde jedoch zu seinen Ehren nach ihm benannt. Seit den 70er Jahren fokussiert er sich auf die Entwicklung von interaktiven Systemen zur Live-Performance.

Der Ingenieur Max Mathews erzählt aus der Frühzeit der Computermusik, präsentiert Beispiele aus seinen Arbeiten und führt seine neuesten Forschungen mit dem elektronischen Dirigierstab "Radio Baton", der mit der Musikhochschule Winterthur & Zürich zusammen entwickelt wurde, vor.



Max Mathews im O-Ton - aufgezeichnet von Bruno Spoerri
Interview with Max Mathews, September 7, 2000

I learned to play the violin when I was in school, starting in the third grade. I never had much talent for this, but I did enjoy it very much and kept on and played in the school orchestra. Actually, I also got to play the sousaphone in the high school band for the football team. I never learned much about music until (this was in the time of the Second World War) I was in the Navy, and I had some spare time - and LP records came into Existence - and there was a listening room in Seattle, Washington, where we were stationed. So I spent my time listening to music and realized that there was a lot more in music than what the violin could do. I kept on playing and enjoying music. The violin is a very sociable instrument, but unfortunately I am such a limited player. So I was trained as a electrical engineeer, and I took a job at Bell Labs in the Acoustical Research Departement.

Digital computers had just become powerful enough to be interesting and I developed programs in which computers simulate new kinds of telephones. This meant that we wouldn't spend years building a telephone and then find out that it was no good. One could write a program to test the coding and in order to test something, you had to put the sound through the telephone and listen to the output to evaluate the quality of music or speech. We made equipment to digitize sound and to convert the digital stream back to sound. It worked. For a man who has done many things for the world, John Pierce, who was alsointerested in music. He encouraged me to write programs to synthesize music which used exactly the same equipment which was used to test telephones, and since I was very dissatisfied with my abilities as a violinist, I was motivated to try to make instruments that were easier to play. I think if I had been a better violinist I might never have bothered with Electronic music. I still play the violin, simply Beethoven and Mozart - and it is one of the most important pleasures of my life. That I came to Bell Labs was pure accident in the beginning. I might have gone to Boeing and made airplanes, I might have gone to the 3M company who was at the time making control systems for air conditioning. I was fortunate to get to Bell Labs, it was a great piece of luck in my life.

I've been interested in live performance with electronic equipment and with synthesizers for many years. I thought the keyboard, the traditional instrument for performance, was very good; but there are many things that are not adapted to the keyboard like, for example, the kind of control the violonist gets with his bow. That made me work on controllers.

The Sequential Drum

The first controller that I made was the Sequential Drum. It was called a drum because you actually had to hit the surface to send a signal. Theinformation that was transmitted at trigger time was where you hit the surface. It turned out that it was quite difficult to make a satisfactory controller and it is still more difficult to make controllers than one expects. In order to sense the position of the spot you hit, the first drum had a bunch of crossed wires on the surface, one set in the x direction, the other set going in the y direction, and when you hit the thing you shorted two wires together and the circuitry could tell, where you hit it. The instrument got a third kind of information, and that depended on how hard you hit the drum. This was obtained with a contact microphone on the plate behind the wires. I made this version when I was working at IRCAM 1, and this drum is still at IRCAM, but it doen't work very well. The trouble was that when you hit it hard enough, a wire broke, like the strings on a violin, so that was not satisfactory. Anyway, it was not a successful controller. It only gave information at trigger times, and so it could not have any continuous control. It did not achieve the kind of control a violinist naturally has.

The Boie Radio Drum

So, after I left IRCAM and returned to Bell Labs, I met this very inventive physicist named Bob Boie, and together we developed some better controllers. We went through quite a number of devices before we got the Radio Baton. The Radio Baton was really Boie's invention. It worked on an entirely different principle than the Sequential Drum. It has two - or you could have more - batons, and in the end of each baton is a small radio transmitter. The performer waves these batons above a plate on the table in front of the performer, a rectangular plate about 20" square containing a rather clever antenna which measures the signal strength from the radio transmitters. In the original design the signal strength was converted into the x-, y- andz-location of the transmitter. The principle was very simple: the nearer the transmitter is to the antenna the stronger the signal. In one design we had five receiving antennas in this plate, two antennas on either side and two antennas on the top and on the bottom of the plate, and one large one in the center of the plate. So, comparing the signal strength of the left to the right antenna the computer, which was processing this information, could tell where the transmitter in the left-right direction was, and by comparing the antenna near the performer and the antenna far from the performer the computer could tell where it was in the y dimension. And by the signal strength of all five antennas together the computer could tell, how far the baton was above the board. So this was a very simple, sufficiently accurate way of tracking the motion of the batons in three-dimensional space. Each baton could transmit three dimensions of information to the computer and these could be used to control a musical performance. The radio frequencies of these transmitters are very low, about 50 kHz, and so this means that what we were actually measuring was the capacitance between the transmitting antenna and the receiving antenna. So it really should not be called a radio measurement, it should be called a capacitance measurement. With the present size antennas , the baton can be detected as far away as about two diameters of the antenna. You can make a bigger antenna, that is not very hard to do. I described the Radio Baton as a three-dimensional sensor, but the present Radio Baton really is what I call a 21/2-dimensional instrument. It can sense the vertical position quite reasonably, but the accuracy of the x and the y position is only good when you're down lose to the panel. As you raise the baton the x and y information deteriorates. This is just part of the basic physics of this kind of detection.

Technically the basic construction of the Radio Baton has a close relation to the Theremin (2) In fact, toward the end of his life Leon Theremin came to Stanford with one of his daughters, and we could play together. It was The Rachmaninoff Vocalise. She played the solo part, and I played the orchestral part with the Radio Baton, but we could not be too close together on the stage because the Radio signals interfered with each other. I think, we had a lot of fun. But there is a big difference between the Theremin and the Radio Baton: and that difference lies in the computer. The Theremin is the world's most difficult electronic instrument to learn to play, and the Radio Baton is the world's easiest instrument to play. The Radio Baton and the conductor program are actually too easy to learn, so that it is not challenging enough for virtuoso performers. The next question, and the more important one, is how you use the six signals to control a musical performance, and that is a question that is not yet completely answered and probably never will be completely answered. In fact that's what Gerald (Bennett) (3) and Johan (Sundberg) (4) and I are working on now. I wrote what I called a conductor program that simulated in some sense an orchestra and made the Radio Baton capture and transmit theinformation that a conductor tries to communicate to an orchestra. There are two kinds of information, that the Radio Baton creates in this case: one is trigger times that correspond to the beats the conductor gives usually with his right hand to control the tempo of the music and to control the precise places, where he wants notes to be played. The other kind of information is continuous information, which could be used to control the dynamics and balance of the instruments in the orchestra. The philosophy that I tried to follow in making the conductor program was to separate music into two parts: one part is the fixed part, the score, which was written by the composer, primarily the sequence of pitches, but also the duration of notes and of course the instruments, timbres that they would be played with. substitutes a different pitch from what the composer has written, he makes a mistake.

The other part of the music I call the expressive part, where the performer does have freedom and in fact must use his own interpretative freedom and his knowledge of how the style of music should be played to adjust things like the phrasing of the music, the small pauses one makes in the ends of phrases, the slight modifications of tempo slowing down and speeding up, the dynamics and possibly other things, as bending the pitch a little bit.

Indeed the kind of expressive things I was concerned with are very similar to the kind of expressive things, that Sundberg was concerned with in his programs for automatic performance. But instead of automatically inserting these expressive changes of interpretation in the score, my interest was in having the conductor inserting this control. And I think, I was interested in that mainly because I think performing music is a great joy, and I wanted to reserve that to a person and not give that over to a computer. I was very much looking at music from a performer's standpoint and not so much from the listener's standpoint; in fact, I don't care if anyone hears me perform, it's the pleasure that I get from it I am primarily concerned with. Considering that the only instrument I play, and as a very limited performer,is the violin, most listeners would quite agree with me that I should perform only for my own pleasure. The idea was to give the expressive control to the performer and take away from him the need for selecting the notes to be played that have been written by the composer. So the conductor program would have an orchestra, a synthesizer actually, play the notes. The score itself would be in the computer memory. When the performer would trigger the next beat in the composition, the computer would correctly play the pitches associated with that beat. The performer could also control if there were more than one note associated with the next beat , e.g. a sequence of sixteenth notes.

The computer would have to know about the tempo to play these notes, and the performer would inherently specify the tempo by the time interval betweenthe last two beats he made. The computer would calculate the tempo for the next beat. That is the most difficult part, and it is not yet satisfactorily solved. it is particularly difficult if the computer plays many fast notes, or if the performer wants to make a accelerando or ritardando. This is avery interesting problem of automatic control. That is the essence of the conductor program and of the Radio Baton. It does useful, pleasant things for traditional music which has a defined score. But there is a lot of music that is improvised, and the conductor program is completely unsuited for improvised music.

There you need something quite different, and in fact I have been experimenting with improvisation programs. In the last five years I taught a class at Stanford University where I asked the students to write a computer program that enables them to improvise in some particular musical style of their selection. They should do better music in whatever style than I can make - that is not difficult, they all succeeded in doing that.

They had to learn to program in C, and I think it is actually easier to learn to program in C than it is in MAX 5, if you want to do something that is not entirely standard in MAX. MAX is very popular and you can do incredible performances in MAX, but in the whole no one does very well at improvising with computers in a fairly defined style. I don't think computer programs can help musicians doing that. It's a very difficult job, a human being is far far better at it, and computer programs get in the way of performers improvising. Computer programs can provide an instrument for a person that has no time to learn to perform on a traditional instrument but who has musical talent. He can use the computer to play the traditional repertoire with some satisfaction. At the moment I see two immediate uses for the conductor program: one isfor instrument teachers to accompany their students, something which is difficult for a teacher who is not a good pianist. And a synthesized accompaniment can approximate an orchestra better than a piano. Vocalists in particular are interested in this kind of ccompaniment, for example for opera arias. The other possibility is something that John Chowning has noticed and named. He called it "active listening". Instead of simply buying a CD and listening to this music, some people might prefer to buy a score of this music and put in the Radio Baton system and conduct the own interpretation of the score. Whether this produces a better musical performance than the performance given by a famous conductor is doubtful, but it may produce a different and better understanding of music. It is quite a different experience than passive listening.

What about the future of the Conductor Program? An orchestra consists of a hundred intelligent performers, who have learned a lot of techniques, a lot about musical styles and interpretation. The synthesizer is very unintelligent. If I stop beating time with Conductor, the program will stop. If a conductor stops beating time in front of an orchestra, they will continue to play, and play well. My hope is, that we can make the synthesizer somewhat more intelligent and sensitive by incorporating some of the rules that Johan (Sundberg) has worked out. This also raises another interesting complex: the conflict between what the rules do to the music, and what I would like to do to the music with my will; e.g. I control the tempo and I control the onset of notes with my beats, and Johan's program also controls the onset of notes with his program, and I might not like that. In fact this is not unrealistic. The user should have the last word, he can throw away some of the rules. The question is: how can he overrule things that he doesn't want.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------

1) The Theremin, invented by the Russian physicist Lev (Leon) Termen (Theremin) in 1920, is a space-oriented electronic instrument.
2) IRCAM in Paris, research institute for computer music.
3) Gerald Bennett, composer and co-director of the Swiss Center for Computer Music in Zurich, Switzerland.
4) Johan Sundberg, professor of musical acoustics, Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm
5) MAX is a programming language, developed at IRCAM and named in honour of Max Mathews. It is used mostly for interactive computer music programming.

Interview, transcription and annotations: Bruno Spoerri, with the help of Dorine Abegg and Gerald Bennett.




Max Mathews, Vater der Computermusik
von Bruno Spoerri, April 2001 (www.computerjazz.ch)

"Wenn ich ein besserer Geiger gewesen wäre, hätte ich mich wahrscheinlich nicht mit elektronischer Musik beschäftigt". Der 74jährige Max Mathews, der dies schmunzelnd sagt, gilt als "Vater der Computermusik". Und tatsächlich wäre die Geschichte der Computermusik anders verlaufen, wenn Mathews ein begabter Violinist oder, anders herum, ein unmusikalischer Techniker gewesen wäre.

In der dritten Schulklasse begann Mathews Geige zu spielen. Bald musste er einsehen, dass er nicht sehr talentiert war; aber er liebte Musik, spielte im Schulorchester mit und bediente im Blasorchester auch das Sousaphon. In der Zeit des 2. Weltkriegs war er zwar im Militär, hatte aber viel freie Zeit und konnte in einem Abhörraum stundenlang Musik anhören. "Ich realisierte damals, dass Musik mehr ist als nur technische Fertigkeit auf einem Instrument." Nach dem Studium als Elektroingenieur suchte Mathews eine Stelle und landete, zufällig, wie er betont, im Jahr 1955 im Laboratorium für akustische Forschung des Telefonkonzerns Bell. Seine Aufgabe war es, die Sprachverständlichkeit und Klangfarbentreue der Telefone zu verbessern.

Für seine Testreihen benötigte er genau definierte Testtöne und Sprachklänge, und da lag es nahe, die neu entwickelten digitalen Rechner zu verwenden. Die theoretischen Grundlagen dazu waren schon seit einiger Zeit von Shannon und Nyquist (auch ein Mitarbeiter der Bell Labs) bereitgestellt worden; man wusste, dass eine beliebige Schallwelle genügend genau durch eine Ziffernfolge dargestellt und somit in einem Computer errechnet werden kann. Auf dieser Grundlage schrieben Mathews und seine Mitarbeiter ein Programm, in dem die benötigten Zahlenreihen definiert werden konnten. Mutig extrapolierte der musikbegeisterte Mathews seine Aufgabe, die ja nur darin bestanden hätte, Sprachklänge herzustellen. Er entwarf ein allgemeines Klangsyntheseprogramm, das er MUSIC I nannte. Gerechnet wurde auf dem für damalige Verhältnisse riesigen IBM 704 Computer am IBM Hauptsitz in New York; die Digitalbänder wurden dann nach Murray Hill in New Jersey zurückgebracht und auf dem ersten und einzigen Digital-Analog-Konverter der Welt in Klang umgewandelt. Der Psychologe Newman Guttman schrieb mit MUSIC I 1957 die erste digitale Klangstudie "In the Silver Scale" - ein Stück, das allerdings noch wenig vorausahnen liess, dass Computermusik auch angenehm klingen könnte. 1958 folgte MUSIC II mit der Möglichkeit, vierstimmig und mit total 16 Wellenformen zu arbeiten. Music V, zehn Jahre später entwickelt, legte die endgültige Form des Programmpakets fest, das bis heute in vielen Abwandlungen die Grundlage der Klangsynthese mit dem Computer bildet.

Der synthetische Interpret

Mathews kam immer wieder zurück auf sein Grundanliegen, Musik befriedigend zu spielen, ohne vorher grosse Fingerfertigkeit auf einem Musikinstrument erwerben zu müssen. 1970 entwickelte er ein hybrides System, einen computergesteuerten Analogsynthesizer, der ihn diesem Ziel näherbrachte. Seine Idee bestand darin, die Aufgabe der Darbietung konventionell komponierter Musik in zwei Teile zu teilen: die Partitur mit allen Angaben über Tonhöhen, Tondauern und Klangfarben wird im Steuercomputer gespeichert; die Interpretation, das heisst vor allem Tempo, Lautstärkeverlauf, Feinheiten der Ausführung werden von einem dirigierenden Musiker geregelt - eine Idee, die übrigens früher schon annähernd auf "Player Pianos" realisiert worden war.

Das Conductor-Programm (ab 1969) für den GROOVE-Synthesizer konnte von mehreren Steuereinheiten beeinflusst werden: einem Joystick, der so gross war, dass er mit Dirigiergesten bewegt werden konnte, einer Spezialtastatur und einer Trommel, die durch Dehnungsmessung der Membran die Stärke des Aufschlags übermittelte. Jeder Schlag auf die Trommel oder jede Joystick-Bewegung gab dem Computer das Signal, eine weitere Viertelnote in der eingegebenen Partitur vorzurücken. Vor allem die Trommel erwies sich als praktikables Konzept und diente als Ausgangspunkt für die weitere Entwicklungsarbeit, die Mathews auf Einladung des Dirigenten und Komponisten Pierre Boulez im Forschungsinstitut IRCAM in Paris weiterführte. Die "Sequential Drum" von 1980 hatte ein Geflecht von rechtwinklig angeordneten Drähten. Ein Schlag führte zu einem Kontakt zwischen den Drähten und erlaubte, die Position des Anschlags festzustellen. Diese x-y-Messwerte wurden dann zur Steuerung verschiedener Parameter der Musik benutzt, sowie ein zusätzlicher Messwert, der mit Hilfe eines Mikrofons aus der Anschlagstärke abgeleitet wurde. Allerdings realisierte Mathews in dieser Phase der Arbeit, dass es bedeutend schwieriger als erwartet war, ein sinnvolles Steuersystem für Musik herzustellen. Bei starken Schlägen brachen die Drähte, zudem war keine kontinuierliche Information über die Dirigierbewegungen des Interpreten vorhanden: nur im Moment des Anschlagens wurden kurzzeitig Messungen von Anschlagort und -stärke möglich.

Der Radio Baton

Nach der Rückkehr von Paris in die Bell Labs ging Mathews das Problem mit der Hilfe des Physikers Bob Boie an. Zusammen fanden sie nach einigen Irrwegen eine neuartige und bessere Lösung: in die Spitze von zwei Trommelschlegeln wurden kleine Sender eingebaut, die Wellen in der Grössenordnung von 50 kiloHertz aussandten. In einem viereckigen, auf dem Tisch liegenden Gehäuse waren Antennen angebracht, die die Stärke der Strahlung sehr genau massen. Ein Computer wertete die Messungen aus. Die Differenz zwischen den Messwerten der linken und rechten Antenne zum Beispiel zeigte ständig die Position des Schlegels auf der x-Achse. Ebenso wurde die Position auf der y-Achse gemessen sowie durch Summierung aller Messwerte der vertikale Abstand vom Antennengehäuse. Das Gerät, ausgestattet mit einem MIDI-Ausgang, fand sofort Anklang bei Musikern. Die amerikanischen Komponisten Richard Boulanger, Andrew Schloss and David Jaffe begannen 1986 Stücke zu schreiben und Improvisationen zu kreieren für das Instrument, das nun Radio Baton oder auch Radio Drum genannt wurde. Als besonders wertvoll erwies sich die Möglichkeit, einen gespielten Ton nach dem Anschlag durch Bewegungen in der Luft spielerisch zu verformen.

Mathews selber hatte seine eigenen Ideen zur Verwendung seines Radio Batons. Er nahm die Arbeit an seinem Conductor-Programm wieder auf, fütterte es mit Partituren von Bach und Mozart und gab Vorführungen als Dirigent seines eigenen Synthesizer-Orchesters. Es war erstaunlich: wenn man sich an den Anblick des mit zwei Trommelschlegeln dirigierenden Mathews gewöhnt hatte, entdeckte man, wie viele Nuancen er mit seinen Bewegungen aus den doch sehr synthetisch klingenden MIDI-Geräten herausholte. "Ich denke, Musik zu interpretieren, ist ein grosses Vergnügen. Und wenn man das tun kann, ohne die Mühsal, vorher ein Instrument zu beherrschen, ist es umso schöner." Mathews meint auch: "Der Radio Baton ist für einen musikalischen Menschen das am leichtesten zu erlernende Instrument der Welt." Allerdings sieht er die Bedeutung seiner Entwicklungsarbeit weniger im Konzertsaal als in der privaten Kammer, vor allem als willkommene Hilfe für Instrumentallehrer. "Vor allem beim Unterrichten von Sängern und Sängerinnen ist es für den Lehrenden mühsam, immer am Klavier begleiten zu müssen - mit dem Radio Baton kann er die Rolle des Dirigenten übernehmen und sich viel mehr auf den Schüler konzentrieren."

Eine weitere Anregung für die Anwendung des Radio Baton-Systems stammt vom Komponisten John Chowning. Er nennt es "active listening", aktives Hören von Musik. Er stellt sich vor, dass der musikinteressierte Hörer nicht einfach eine CD abspielt, sondern die Musik selber dirigiert und damit ein viel besseres Verständnis für die Komposition erwirbt.

Viele Details sind allerdings noch nicht befriedigend gelöst. Ein vergessener Schlag mit dem Baton verwirrt das System völlig. Abrupte oder auch schon kleinere Tempoänderungen können unschön interpretierte Tonfolgen bewirken, besonders wenn die Partitur an dieser Stelle viele Töne enthält. Unabhängig von Max Mathews hat sich der Akustikforscher Johan Sundberg, Professor im Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm schon lange mit diesen Problemen befasst. Er studierte die interpretatorischen Finessen von guten Musikern und versuchte, Regeln und Gesetzmässigkeiten der "richtigen" Interpretation zu finden. Diese Regeln übertrug er auf die Wiedergabe von Partituren mit Computern und Synthesizern und erreichte tatsächlich in vielen Fällen eine lebendigere, echter wirkende Aufführung. Gerald Bennett, Studienleiter für Computermusik an der Musikhochschule Zürich, hat Mathews und Sundberg zusammengebracht und ein gemeinsames, von der Musikhochschule unterstütztes Forschungsprojekt initiiert. Ziel des Projekts ist ein verfeinertes Conductor-Programm. Die von Sundberg ausgearbeiteten Automatismen sollen dort in die Bresche springen, wo die Steuersignale des Radio Baton nicht genügen, um die eher leblosen Klänge des Synthesizers musikalisch zu beleben. Mathews war anfangs noch skeptisch: "Wie kann ich die Sundbergschen Regeln umgehen, wenn sie in mein System eingebaut sind, mir aber in einem Einzelfall nicht gefallen?" Die bisherige Arbeit hat effektiv zur interessanten Situation geführt, dass Regeln und Dirigent bisweilen in Konflikt geraten - eine Situation, die der realen Situation im Orchesteralltag ähnelt. Es ist die Aufgabe der kommenden Wochen, eine musikalisch überzeugende Lösung zu finden.

Bruno Spoerri, April 2001 (www.computerjazz.ch)




Neue Zürcher Zeitung Ressort Medien und Informatik
Freitag, 27. April 2001, Nr. 97, Seite 85
Dirigieren mit Trommelschlegeln - Max Mathews, Vater der Computermusik

«Wenn ich ein besserer Geiger gewesen wäre, hätte ich mich wahrscheinlich nicht mit elektronischer Musik beschäftigt», sagt Max Mathews schmunzelnd. Der 74-Jährige gilt als «Vater der Computermusik» und weilt derzeit in der Schweiz.

In der dritten Schulklasse begann Mathews Geige zu spielen, doch bald musste er einsehen, dass er nicht sehr talentiert war. Aber er liebte Musik, spielte im Schulorchester mit und bediente im Blasorchester auch das Sousaphon. In der Zeit des Zweiten Weltkriegs war er im Militär, hatte viel freie Zeit und konnte stundenlang Musik hören. «Ich realisierte damals, dass Musik mehr ist als nur technische Fertigkeit auf einem Instrument.» Nach dem Studium als Elektroingenieur suchte Mathews eine Stelle und landete, zufällig, wie er betont, im Jahr 1955 im Laboratorium für akustische Forschung des Telefonkonzerns Bell. Seine Aufgabe war es, die Qualität der telefonischen Sprachübertragung zu verbessern. Für seine Testreihen benötigte er genau definierte, künstliche Sprachproben, und da lag es nahe, die neu entwickelten digitalen Rechner zu verwenden.

Mutig erweiterte der musikbegeisterte Mathews seine Aufgabe. Er entwarf ein allgemeines Klangsyntheseprogramm, das er Music I nannte. Gerechnet wurde auf dem für damalige Verhältnisse riesigen IBM-704-Computer am IBM-Hauptsitz in New York; die Magnetbänder wurden dann nach Murray Hill in New Jersey zurückgebracht und auf dem ersten und einzigen Digital-Analog-Konverter der Welt in Klang umgewandelt. Der Psychologe Newman Guttman schrieb mit Music I 1957 die erste digitale Klangstudie, «In the Silver Scale» - ein Stück, das kaum erahnen liess, dass Computermusik dereinst auch angenehm klingen könnte. 1958 folgte Music II mit der Möglichkeit, vierstimmig und mit total 16 Wellenformen zu arbeiten. Music V, zehn Jahre später entwickelt, legte die endgültige Form des Programmpakets fest, das bis heute in vielen Abwandlungen die Grundlage der computergestützten Klangsynthese bildet.

Musikgenuss ohne Fingerakrobatik

Immer wieder kam Mathews zurück auf sein Grundanliegen, Musik auch ohne grosse Fingerfertigkeit befriedigend zu spielen. 1970 entwickelte er ein hybrides System, einen computergesteuerten Analogsynthesizer, der ihn diesem Ziel näherbrachte. Seine Idee bestand darin, die Aufgabe der Darbietung konventionell komponierter Musik in zwei Teile zu teilen: Die Partitur mit allen Angaben über Tonhöhen, Tondauern und Klangfarben wird im Steuercomputer gespeichert; die Interpretation, etwa Tempo und Lautstärke, ist Sache des dirigierenden Musikers - eine Idee, die früher schon auf «Player Pianos» ansatzweise realisiert worden war.

Das Conductor-Programm (ab 1969) für den Groove-Synthesizer konnte von mehreren Steuereinheiten beeinflusst werden: einem Steuerknüppel, der so gross war, dass er den für Dirigenten typischen Armbewegungen folgen konnte, einer Spezialtastatur und einer Trommel, die durch Dehnungsmessung der Membran die Stärke des Aufschlags übermittelte. Jeder Schlag auf die Trommel oder jede Bewegung des Steuerknüppels gab dem Computer das Signal, eine weitere Viertelnote in der eingegebenen Partitur vorzurücken. Vor allem die Trommel erwies sich als praktikables Konzept und diente als Ausgangspunkt für die weitere Entwicklungsarbeit, die Mathews auf Einladung des Dirigenten und Komponisten Pierre Boulez im Forschungsinstitut Ircam in Paris durchführte.

Sensible Trommeln

Die «Sequential Drum» von 1980 hatte ein Geflecht von rechtwinklig angeordneten Drähten. Ein Schlag führte zu einem Kontakt zwischen den Drähten und erlaubte, die Position des Anschlags festzustellen. Diese Messwerte sowie ein zusätzlicher Wert, der mit Hilfe eines Mikrophons aus der Anschlagstärke abgeleitet wurde, dienten der Steuerung verschiedener Parameter der Musik. Allerdings erwies sich die Entwicklung eines intuitiv zu bedienenden Steuersystems schwieriger als erwartet. Bei starken Schlägen brachen die Drähte, zudem war keine kontinuierliche Information über die Dirigierbewegungen des Interpreten vorhanden: Nur im Moment des Anschlagens waren Messungen von Anschlagort und -stärke möglich.

Nach der Rückkehr von Paris in die Bell Labs ging Mathews das Problem mit der Hilfe des Physikers Bob Boie an. Zusammen fanden sie nach einigen Irrwegen eine neuartige und bessere Lösung: In die Spitze von zwei Trommelschlegeln wurden kleine Sender eingebaut; in einem viereckigen, auf dem Tisch liegenden Gehäuse waren Antennen angebracht, die die Stärke der 50-KHz-Signale sehr genau registrierten. Das Gerät, ausgestattet mit einem MIDI-Ausgang, fand sofort Anklang bei Musikern. Die amerikanischen Komponisten Richard Boulanger, Andrew Schloss and David Jaffe begannen 1986, Stücke zu schreiben und Improvisationen zu kreieren für das Instrument, das nun Radio Baton oder auch Radio Drum genannt wurde.

Mathews - mittlerweile Musikprofessor an der Stanford University - nahm die Arbeit an seinem Conductor-Programm wieder auf, fütterte es mit Partituren von Bach und Mozart und gab Vorführungen als Dirigent seines eigenen Synthesizer-Orchesters. Es war erstaunlich, wie viele Nuancen der mit zwei Trommelschlegeln dirigierende Mathews aus den doch sehr synthetisch klingenden MIDI-Geräten herausholte. «Ich denke, Musik zu interpretieren, ist ein grosses Vergnügen. Und wenn man das tun kann ohne die Mühsal, vorher ein Instrument zu beherrschen, ist es umso schöner.» Mathews meint auch: «Der Radio Baton ist für einen musikalischen Menschen das am leichtesten zu erlernende Instrument der Welt.»

Allerdings sieht er die Bedeutung seiner Entwicklungsarbeit weniger im Konzertsaal als in der privaten Kammer, vor allem als willkommene Hilfe für Instrumentallehrer. «Vor allem beim Unterrichten von Sängern und Sängerinnen ist es für den Lehrenden mühsam, immer am Klavier begleiten zu müssen - mit dem Radio Baton kann er die Rolle des Dirigenten übernehmen und sich besser auf den Schüler konzentrieren.» Eine weitere Anregung für die Anwendung des Radio- Baton-Systems stammt vom Komponisten John Chowning. Er nennt es «active listening», aktives Hören von Musik. Er stellt sich vor, dass der musikinteressierte Hörer nicht einfach eine CD abspielt, sondern die Musik selber dirigiert und damit ein viel besseres Verständnis für die Komposition erwirbt.

Dirigent contra Orchester

Viele Details sind allerdings noch nicht befriedigend gelöst. Ein fehlender Schlag mit dem Baton verwirrt das System völlig. Abrupte oder auch schon kleinere Tempoänderungen können unschön interpretierte Tonfolgen bewirken, besonders wenn die Partitur an dieser Stelle viele Töne enthält. Unabhängig von Mathews hat sich der Akustikforscher Johan Sundberg, Professor im Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm, schon lange mit ähnlichen Problemen befasst. Er studierte die interpretatorischen Finessen von guten Musikern und versuchte, Regeln und Gesetzmässigkeiten der «richtigen» Interpretation zu finden. Diese Regeln übertrug er auf die Wiedergabe von Partituren mit Computern und Synthesizern und erreichte tatsächlich in vielen Fällen eine lebendigere, echter wirkende Aufführung.

Gerald Bennett, Studienleiter für Computermusik an der Musikhochschule Zürich, hat Mathews und Sundberg zusammengebracht und ein gemeinsames, von der Musikhochschule unterstütztes Forschungsprojekt initiiert. Ziel des Projekts ist ein verfeinertes Conductor-Programm. Die von Sundberg ausgearbeiteten Automatismen sollen dort in die Bresche springen, wo die Steuersignale des Radio Baton nicht genügen, um die eher leblosen Klänge des Synthesizers musikalisch zu beleben. Mathews war anfangs noch vorsichtig: «Wie kann ich die Sundberg'schen Regeln umgehen, wenn sie in mein System eingebaut sind, mir aber in einem Einzelfall nicht gefallen?» Die bisherige Arbeit hat zur interessanten Situation geführt, dass Regeln und Dirigent bisweilen in Konflikt geraten - eine Situation, die aber im Orchesteralltag nicht unbekannt ist.

Bruno Spoerri

Max Mathews wird am 2., 3. und 4. Mai in Bern, Zürich und Basel jeweils um 20.00 Uhr aus der Frühzeit der Computermusik erzählen, Beispiele seiner Arbeit präsentieren und den elektronischen Dirigierstab vorführen. Die Veranstaltung wird vom Migros-Kulturprozent in Zusammenarbeit mit dem Schweizerischen Zentrum für Computermusik organisiert.


Neue Zürcher Zeitung Ressort Medien und Informatik
Freitag, 27. April 2001, Nr. 97, Seite 85



Ausserdem
Gewinner

Cod.Act

Cod.Act gewannen im September den Grand Prix Schweizer Musik 2019. Mit ihren kynetischen Klangskulpturen und algorithmischen Kompositionen verwischen sie die Grenzen zwischen Medienkunst, Performance und Musik.

Diskussion

Heritage in Peril

Wie kann Technologie genutzt werden um Kulturerbe zu erhalten? Eine Veranstaltung von Swissnex in New York.

Artist Talk

50 Jahre Mondlandung

Was hat die Geschichte der Raumfahrt mit der Geschichte der elektronischen Musik zu tun? - Der Weltraumjournalist Bruno Stanek und der Synthesizer-Pionier Bruno Spoerri erinnern sich.